LETTERS TO THE EDITOR (06/01/2021)

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Don’t Shed Tears For Traders

THE government buckled under pressure from traders and has kept on hold the Goa municipalities (amendment) ordinance. The traders are opposing the ordinance; they fear that its implementation will have adverse impact on their business. Their concerns may be legitimate, but they conveniently forget that many of them conduct business illegally in municipal markets. It is pertinent to note here that several traders have not paid to the CCP various taxes and levies. The traders close their eyes to the fact that shops/premises changed hands many a times without the approval from the municipal authorities. The government should be sympathetic towards honest traders, but should deal with an iron hand with those conducting their trade illegally in the municipal markets over the years.

ROSARIO MENEZES, VASCO

PM Can’t Be Insensitive To Farmers

DURING the aftermath of Gujarat riots, the then prime minister A B Vajpayee advised the then chief minister Narendra Modi to practise ‘rajdharma’. The same advice is coming back to haunt Modi, as it appears that he has not learnt his lesson. Farmers on Delhi’s borders are shivering in the excessive cold; they were drenched by rain over the weekend. But Modi and his ministers are ensconced in their bungalows. Rulers should know that when people suffer and you are insensitive towards them then your rule is likely to be shortlived. You can win elections with the ‘gift of the gab’, but running a government is a completely different ball game.  The Prime Minister   must have realised this by now.

S KAMAT, ALTO ST CRUZ

Put Up Face Mask Signboards

CONSIDERING the rise in tourist footfalls since December, the Travel and Tourism Association of Goa wants the government to install signboards at strategic spots reminding visitors to wear masks. This is a step in the right direction and such signboards need to be put up on the beaches as well as other places of tourist interest. The signboard should also specify the fine of Rs 200 to be paid for not wearing the mask. It should also be made mandatory for all shops and other business establishments to put up a signboard which reads ‘no entry without mask’. However, it is observed that many a time the person behind the counter at the shops as well as the other staff are seen not wearing the mask. The shopkeeper and staff need to lead by example and wear the mask at all times. At hotels and tea stalls, all waiters should mandatorily wear the mask. Many tourists prefer to carry the mask in their pockets only to be worn when they see a cop.

ADELMO FERNANDES, VASCO

People Trample On Traffic Norms 

WITH new rules in the offing, traffic enforcement in the state will deservedly receive the fillip necessary to streamline the unruly vehicular movement that results in perennial bottlenecks in cities. People have been made to believe that there would be improvement in vehicular traffic movement, considering the steep hike in penalties proposed for various traffic violations. Although one fails to understand the penchant shown by the people to park their vehicles just opposite the shops where they intend making purchases and hampering the smooth flow of traffic, it is this noxious habit that the authorities need to caution the public against. Clamping down on these inconsiderate ways of many erring motorists, the violators need to be made an example of in order to ensure that such irresponsible acts are not repeated ever again. But alas, such thoughts are just pleasing to imagine, without any factual substantiations backing them! One may have noticed that no sooner some mini-malls or shopping arcades come up anywhere in the city, the thoroughfares in their vicinities suddenly take on a congested look with vehicles parked haphazardly and impeding the vehicular movement. This has become a trend on streets near the suburban shopping centres as well. Rather than blaming the police for inefficient management of the vehicular traffic, we should blame the lack of traffic sense among the commuting public; it should come in for some serious ‘introspection’. People must curb such instincts which come of an emphasis on their own convenience and learn to park at designated places only. While we have taken great pains to point out the follies of the commuting public, it would however be a great injustice to remain mum on the ungainly ways of the drivers of heavy vehicles who have often invited public wrath for their inconsiderate ways. While there is a strict regulation against heavy vehicles using the interior roads in the cities and villages, these are preferred routes for many considering the sparse movement of vehicles on these roads.

PACHU MENON, MARGAO