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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Justice Delivery Is Painfully Slow

EVERYONE pitches for speedy justice to the aggrieved. We often wonder about the reasons for the undue delay in justice delivery. We lament the delay on the part of the government to fill up vacant posts in the judiciary, especially when there are so many qualified people waiting for employment opportunities. In this context, a startling revelation that there are 40 per cent vacancies in the high courts is most unfortunate. The Supreme Court has urged the Centre to confirm the names sent to it by the collegium headed by the Chief Justice of India and appoint judges within a timeframe of six months. On the one hand, people seek speedy justice, while  on the other hand there are lapses in appointing the judges promptly. We earnestly feel that the red tapism in government should be wiped out. The  procedure of routing the files to and fro results in undue delay, not only in the judicial system but also generally. The Hyderabad encounter killings have triggered a heated debate on the social media. The ‘encounter’  has been widely justified, as people believe that the killings have rendered speedy justice. Those justifying the encounter draw a parallel to  the Nirbhaya case, where a 23-year-old paramedic was brutally raped in Delhi on December 16, 2012. Later the  woman died after waging a battle for life. The guilty, who have been sentenced to death,  have not yet been hanged. A social  media post makes a reference to a rape case in the Middle East: the  rapist was sentenced to  death within three  minutes of the crime, and was publicly shot dead. We in no way favour  such a reckless justice delivery system but fully stand by the provisions of criminal jurisprudence. But what aggrieves us is that in the Delhi case, despite the fast track court convicting the accused  and awarding them  death sentence within a year and thereafter the High Court and even the Supreme Court upholding the same speedily, the matter is still hanging fire. A convict has filed a review petition, and  there could  be mercy petitions,  prolonging the  ire and the agony of family members.

MICHAEL VAZ, MERCES

Honour Unsung Heroes Of Tiatr

OVER the years the Konkani Tiatr has become a very popular form of entertainment for Goans. Thanks to the directors and actors this form of entertainment has been handed down from one generation to another. But then besides the director and the actors, there are several artists working behind the scene who contribute to  the success of a particular Tiatr which could even go to complete a century of shows. Those working behind the scene are those who set the stage, the man behind the lighting who give the special effect and of course the musicians who play while the singers sing on the stage. All these are ‘unsung heroes’ whose contribution to the success of a particular Tiatr is seldom recognied. The musicians who provide the music are like the pillars of a Tiatr. Now we even have women who play the trumpet and the saxophone for the Tiatr. Of late, some directors have made it a point to acknowledge the contribution of musicians by announcing their names. It would be desirable for the director to also give credit to the other artists working behind the scene by introducing them by calling them on stage including those who set the stage, the one providing light effects, and of course the  musicians.

ADELMO FERNANDES, VASCO

Focus On Streetlight in Ponda

STREETLIGHT fixtures have  been out of action at several locations in Ponda taluka, inconveniencing pedestrians and travellers. Two fixtures are found missing from  the high mast standing at Tisk in Ponda. Such a situation puts  the electricity department in a bad light. I earnestly urge senior officials of the electricity department to take a remedial action so that pedestrians and motorists do not suffer while travelling through the area.

PRAVIN U SARDESSAI, ADPAI

Unravel Truth Of Encounter Killings

THE Hyderabad encounter has left the country confounded. In Hyderabad, and elsewhere, the policemen who participated in the ‘encounter’ were hailed as  ‘messiahs’.  Surprise, surprise, the ‘heroes’ were showered with rose petals – a very, very unusual sight.     While the common sentiment was inclined towards the law enforcers, politicians were caught in a Catch-22 situation. Some nodded their heads in agreement at dawn only to sport a circumspect face at dusk.   Be that as it may, the most critical question that arises for consideration is: whether or not the encounter was genuine.  Generally, a majority of the police encounters are stage-managed or, in common words, ‘fake killings’ or  ‘extrajudicial killings’.  Mostly, the encounter killings are made to look authentic or actual. Anyone with some knowledge about the police methods would vouch for the foolproof ways of the police.  If at all criminals  do hoodwink the police, lay hands on their weapons, and ‘invite’ them for a  chase, then  it is only in one place: Bollywood films. It is not child’s play for a criminal to throw stones or  snatch police weapons. That the four men were not handcuffed – the  version of the police commissioner – sows the  seeds of suspicion in the minds.  So, the next obvious question would be: “what prompted the police to take recourse to the extreme step”. It is preposterous to assume a police commissioner would take such a major decision in a case of widespread anguish without ‘orders’. Who gave the ‘orders’ is the subsequent question.  Now that the four men are gone, it is impossible to know whether they were the real culprits.   It is not uncommon for police to ‘fix’ accusations in sensitive cases. If the police version is true then they should be decorated because letting the four accused off the hook would have meant a serious public backlash. In the dark of the night, they did well to eliminate the accused without bothering whether they were targeting their knees or chest. In a high-profile case like this, were not the police officers putting their careers at stake by such cold-blooded murders?  Somewhere, between the dark and the sunlight, lies the truth.

GANAPATHI  BHAT, AKOLA

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