Tuesday , 25 September 2018
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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Ill-conceived Move On Migrants

SOME village panchayats have decided to issue ID cards to the migrant workers living in the jurisdiction of their villages. I am intrigued by the   decision. I appreciate the  intent of the   move – the ID cards will help locals know the identified labourers – but the proposal could become  a handy tool for the sarpanchas to  extort money from migrants. There is another possibility.   The ID cards may be misused by migrants to obtain residence certificates in connivance with government officials. These illegally obtained certificates  would open  a window to the migrants to all the facilities and schemes presently enjoyed by Goans.  The issuance of ID cards would also entail a cost for the panchayats.   Hence the best option before the panchayats is to make good use of Aadhaar cards of the migrants,  mandating  them  to seek clearance from the  police upon showing the  Aadhaar cards.

PELDIN FERNANDES, CURCHOREM

Faltering On ODF Deadline

IT is always good to set a deadline to complete a job so that one can work within the known timeframe and complete it. Although government does set a deadline for every project, things don’t happen on time because of lack of seriousness and commitment. Take the case of the third Mandovi bridge. It has missed  three deadlines, and is not ready yet. The initiative  for development of Mapusa as a smart city is yet to take off in earnest. This has been the case with a number of public projects. And now we hear that making Goa ‘open defecation free’ by October 2, 2018 as promised by the government, is sure to miss the deadline. Unless we make it compulsory for the owners to provide toilets to migrant tenants to whom they rent out their outhouses and shanties, and also see that the local bodies enforce the rule, the end of open defecation in Goa will be remain a distant dream.      Reverting to the point of deadlines, the government should try to set realistic and reasonable deadlines for the projects, not political ones to keep people in hope, and see that they are taken seriously, failing which people will lose faith and take them as a joke.

RODNEY DE SOUZA, ASSAGAO

Feuds In Political Families

THIS is with reference to the media reports about the elder son of a leading politician being dissatisfied about his political career. Similar family disputes  had surfaced in the past in other regional political parties. Those who want to adopt dynastic traditions  in their political parties should adopt one-child theory to avoid any legacy disputes or dissatisfaction about their political heir. Politics has become  family business for politicians running political parties. Even otherwise also, disputes in business after division in families are  quite common even with top industrial houses.

MADHU AGRAWAL, DELHI

 

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