Saturday , 17 November 2018
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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Curb Ponda Stray Cattle

IN Ponda the stray cattle menace has turned into a serious issue. Cattle not only occupy the footpaths/ parking areas and entrance area of shops, but also wander along the main road. They are dangerous for the precious lives of innocent travellers, in particular motorcycle riders and pillion riders. Over the years many accidents have occurred on the roads due to the presence of cattle, in particular during the night. The Ponda Municipal Council (PMC) should take prompt action to curb the ever-growing menace.

PRAVIN U SARDESSAI, ADPAI

Watershed Moment In Gender Justice

THERE is not much difference in essence of the views expressed in my letter on Kathua (NT, April 18, 2018) with that of Samir Khan’s reply (NT, April 20) and Kajal Chatterjee’s response (NT, April 21). When a rape has been culminated in murder by a criminal, it is a common error to brand him as a rapist. As a matter of fact, he should be called a killer rapist and must get double punishment for his capital offence – if it is a life imprisonment then it should be to keep him in an isolated cell till his death. Similar to this common error, our society had accepted rape and murder as, so to speak, an old normal. Then Nirbhaya happened. It was a public tsunami against such an offence. It could have been a watershed in the history of gender justice had we remained as vocal post – Nirbhaya. Apart from the incident that has been mentioned by Kajal Chatterjee, as many as six Dalit Nirbhayas are raped every day in our country. Many of such rapes end in murders. Unfortunately, agonizing series of atrocities against downtrodden girls remain just as “o hota hai” even post – Nirbhaya. Things came to such a pass that some people, politicians and advocates had gone to such extremes as to openly leap to the defence of the criminals who kidnapped, raped and murdered a small nomadic tribal girl. Such protest, as it were, the reverse – Nirbhaya, was staged to create Bhaya (fear) in the minds of the nomadic Bakarwal community to which the Kathua girl belonged. It tells a very sad tale of not only lust but also of greed of some people who must have had a motive for gain in terrorising and banishing the tribal people from the forest area in Jammu province. Now, when the people are slowly raising their voice of sanity in favour of a tribal victim, it looks like rain on burning desert sands. Let it be a downpour that can wash out our apathy towards our Dalit/ poor/ downtrodden brothers and sisters of our country.

SUJIT DE, KOLKATA

 

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