Thursday , 20 September 2018
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Letting bygones be bygones

During one of her recent interviews, Kareena Kapoor was asked about the projects she let go of — including blockbusters such as Ram Leela, Queen, Chennai Express, Fashion, Kal Ho Na Ho and Black. The actress is said to have replied, “I am honoured and glad to give work to other people. I hope these actresses become stars now that I have rejected big projects.” 
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Salute the woman

Rani Lakshmibai, was the queen of the Maratha-ruled princely state of Jhansi, situated in the north-central part of India. She was one of the leading figures of the Indian Rebellion of 1857 and for Indian nationalists a symbol of resistance to the rule of the British East India Company in the subcontinent.
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We need to find a scapegoat

When a submarine sinks and another literally catches fire, alarm bells go off. This isn’t your weekly MiG 21 crash. It’s something very deep, right down to the seabed. It’s enough for bureaucrats in the defence ministry to wake up and say, ‘we need to find a scapegoat quick’.
While the country needs an army, navy and air force to defend it, all a bureaucrat requires is sheets of paper, a steno and a lot of words placed in neat lines with double spacing, or single spacing just to make it difficult for anyone to read between the lines.
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Homemade wines rule in Goa

We Goans love our food and wine. We love life and celebrate it. Don’t we? Can you imagine a Goan household without wine? I bet you cannot. Goans love their wines with or without their food. Vinicola Port Wine, from Margao, is a name all of us know. It is a wine which is known the world over. San Andre, Port No 7 are other household names for us wine lovers. These wines in Goa are easy on the wallet, fun to drink and pair well with our local food. Aren’t they?
 
Many Goan families are famous for brewing their own wines. And it is not only for Christmas and other feasts, but even without any apparent good reason. This, I am told is the result of the Portuguese influence. Cool. We are not complaining! 
Wine has comparatively low alcohol content and is one of the drinks preferred by people during a lazy afternoon. Safe to have a glass or two, I assure you. Many families in Salcette, Bardez and Tisvadi in Goa produce wines, but still use primitive methods and baker’s yeast. It is fun to watch them do so, actually. It truly fascinates me. The proportion of yeast, a local manufacturer told me, is critical to the taste. You have got to get it right if you want good wine. 
We all know that grapes have the strongest capacity for producing natural wines. And yes, wines made from grapes are generally the best. However, grapes are not the only fruit used in Goa for making wines. We are truly innovative. Many people do not have a taste for these wines, but they don’t know what they are missing. Yes, there aren’t fancy labels there, but the taste and the drinking experience is unparalleled.
Goa is home to a lot of fruits in summer. We are blessed. The entire process of making wine at home is pure joy. A family activity. Hygiene and cleanliness should be observed for sure. I second that wholeheartedly. Although some families do make grape wines, the novel ones are the fruit wines. Mango, jackfruit, banana, jambul, Goans have used them all. People don’t seem to understand this, but the truth is that any natural edible product that contains sugars and carbohydrates and can be fermented can be converted into a wine. 
There is nothing quite like a glass of homemade wine, live music and a home-cooked meal. Pork Vindaloo or Sorpotel and Sanna maybe? Let’s go for it!
 
(Mini Ribeiro is a food writer and columnist)
Blog: Minifoodesdcapades.wordpress.com 
Twitter: @MiniRib
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Girl’s night out

Sussanne Roshan was spotted at a suburban nightspot with restaurateur Raman Macker and a group of friends. Raman and his wife Ambika Hinduja are friends of the Roshans. Looks like it was a night out for Sussanne and her gang of pals.
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Vishnu and the charioteer

“The atmosphere in this place is stifling,” said the well-endowed man who went by the name of Vishnu. He was standing in a chariot, not a real one, but one strong enough to withstand the rigors of a Shigmo parade.
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