Breaking News

Supplements

Celebrating Food Connoisseurs

On World Chefs Day, NT BUZZ speaks to a few chefs in Goa about their chosen profession and what it means to them Danuska Da Gama | NT BUZZ Thanks to the many televised shows, cooking today is a profession many believe to be close to art, and food tantalises more than just our taste buds. While eating healthy seems …

Read More »

How Bauhaus shaped India

Paramita Ghosh Birthing any new art form is about clearing ground, and building from zero. And German teacher-architect and visionary Walter Gropius did so in the Europe of the 1920s, with the teaching programme he introduced in the Staatliches Bauhaus, a new design school founded just after World War I. Due to its efforts, the house style of the rich …

Read More »

Jack Kerouac: On the road to immortality

Navneet Vyasan Born to French-Canadian parents, Jack Kerouac excelled in sports from a very young age. Initially, never interested in literature, Kerouac’s athletic pursuits won him a sports scholarship at Columbia University in the early 1940s. At the same time, Allen Ginsberg, also won a scholarship at Columbia University and then met Lucien Carr. Carr, a well-read academic, was popular …

Read More »

Sedition is not a Gandhian value, the right to dissent is

Karan Thapar It’s clear what India thinks of Mahatma Gandhi. Officially, we revere him. It’s another matter we honour his memory more in the breach than in the observance. But what would Gandhi make of us? No one bothered to ask when we marked his sesquicentennial. But I wouldn’t be surprised if we’ve embarrassed him. Indeed, at times, he might …

Read More »

The rise of the superbugs and what this means

Maneka Sanjay Gandhi Candida auris, a dangerous fungal infection that emerged in 2009 in Japan, has now spread worldwide, especially in hospitals. It is a superbug: a germ that has evolved defences against all medicines. These include antifungals such as fluconazole (Diflucan), the antifungal drug of choice in many countries, and recently introduced antifungals known as echinocandins. It is responsible …

Read More »

State of female inmates

Lalita Panicker Every time a high profile politician or businessman is sent to jail, stories start cascading about the poor conditions in jails, the denial of home cooked food to the alleged offender, and his inability to meet as many visitors as he would like. The debates centre round whether or not the prisoner should get television sets, newspapers, pedestal …

Read More »

Karachi’s ‘prodigal’ Goans find it hard to return

Frederick Noronha Of all the expat diasporic Goan communities, those who opted to shift to Karachi and other parts of Sindh must be the most sinned against. The pun here might have been funny, if it wasn’t for their sad reality. Many decades after they chose to migrate, their children and grandchildren are still even deprived of the basic right …

Read More »

A visible shift in Indian polity

The rightward shift in the Indian polity is unmistakable. While this process has been underway for decades, its clear manifestation has been visible only after the pivotal elections of 2014. It is not an exaggeration to say that, for the first time, a strong Hindu-oriented government is ruling from Delhi. This government is the product of the century-long movement of …

Read More »

Parsuramksetrotpati : The origin of Parsuramksetra

TENSING RODRIGUES Standing on the summit of the Sahyadri mountain, Parsuram beheld the ocean and ordered it to recede. The ocean did likewise, and lo there was land, about 39 kilometres wide and about 1,288 kilometres long, stretching from Kanyakumari to Nasik-Tryambakesvar. A little earlier, in the chapter Citpavanbramhanotpati [SHKG, 120; SHKD, 303], Parsuramksetra is delimited differently; it sets the …

Read More »

Reading the works of the Ramanujans

CP Surendran Though a much-rewarded scholar, translator, and an exceptionally gifted poet, Ramanujan was disposed to self doubt, anxiety, and depression till his death in 1993. His battle with himself began early. One of his first diary entries (19 March, 1951) when he had just set out as a lecturer in English in Quilon, Kerala, reads: ‘All my wavering and indecision …

Read More »